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once the bombing stops. it's still u.s. policy for gadhafi to go. but that's not the mandate of the united nations mission. this hour, live reports, new information about the battle plan right now, and the president's end game. >>> and fright thing new set backs in japan's nuclear crisis. officials try to put to rest concerns of contaminated food. i'm wolf blitzer you're in "the situation room." >>> anti-aircraft fire over tripoli just a little while ago. one u.s. official tells us coalition attacks appear to have stalled moammar gadhafi and his forces. it's unclear what the libyan leader may be doing next or where he is even right now. gadhafi's compound took a pounding today. u.s. and allied commanders deny they're specifically targeting him or his residents. one u.s. commander acknowledged that gadhafi may still be in power when the bombing stops. president obama says the u.s. will try to push gadhafi out. but within the limits sanctioned by the united nations. >> it is u.s. policy that gadhafi needs to go. we have a wide range of tools to support that policy. when it come
plants right here in the united states. >>> and will the u.s. supreme court green light a massive discrimination lawsuit against walmart? arguments today in one of the most important workers' rights cases the court has ever heard. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> moammar gadhafi and his troops are being accused of new carnage and destruction. just hours after president obama tried to explain the u.s. mission in libya to the american people. this hour we have breaking news. we're learning about major, major setbacks for rebel forces in several cities. in misrata, witnesses say government forces are hammering the city hard, firing bullets over civilians' heads and telling them to run for their lives. gadhafi is fighting back with a vengeance against rebels who had regained ground in recent days under the cover of coalition air strikes. >>> and joining us now in ajdabiya is our own arwa damon. you're with the rebels there. how are they doing, arwa? what's the latest? >> reporter: well, wolf, it's been another bitterly disappointing day for the opposition here. th
safe for infants, i'm wolf blitzer, you're in the "situation room." in a span of 24 hours, the u.s. military said the coalition launched more than 50 strikes in the mission to protect libyan civilians. but no indication the battle is being over. just a short while ago the secretary of state warned gadhafi the quickest way to end it is for him to leave.<[kyk: . we2íor certainly encouraged the would make a right decision. not only institute a real co comprehensive cease-fire but withdraw from the cities and military abs and prepare for a transition that does not incl e include. >> there are serious reports of major clashes under way. what do we know about the fighting at this moment. >> you just heard secretary of state hillary clinton encouraging momammar gadhafi bu he's not backing down. a couple of major developments that shows that this conflict is far from over. anded stage is set from what could be a lengthy and complicated conflict. let's start with a strategically strategic city. then gadhafi forces took it over. when the momentum shifted back to the opposition forces and t
evening. i'm bret baier. pentagon officials say so far the u.s. spent $580 million on the libyan conflict. while we're committed to the operation financially, militarily and diplomatically, questions remain about what it will mean to deem the mission a success. james rosen is at the state department. good evening. >> reporter: good evening. president obama and top commanderrers pushed forward on the parallel and separate path to strip muammar gaddafi of his ability to wage war and pressuring him to resign. today a top nato commander said the missions may connect over time in london, secretary of state hillary clinton met with colleagues from the united nations, europe and arab league to sketch out end game in libya. clinton said arming the libyan rebels were not discussed and only vaguely did she address growing speculation that gaddafi will receive asylum. >> we believe he must go. we're working with the international community to try to achieve that outcome. and look for political resolution which could include leaving the country. >> bret: we are not engaged and look for him to go does
in the middle east and tonight a u.s. ally is on the brink. i'm shepard smith. the news starts now. >> the president of yemen now promising to step down on one condition. tonight what he says has to happen and what about american interests if he actually does go. plus, in syria, and in jordan, new anger and new calls for change. l we'll take you inside the growing rage in the region and see what it means for us. >> plus, in libya, nato is getting set to take over the no-fly zone but american forces are still very much a part of this war. tonight, what washington plans and is there any end game? but first on fox this friday night, white house has announced president obama will address the nation monday evening. we're told he'll focus on the situation in libya during comments from the national defense university in d.c. the address is scheduled 7:30 eastern. earlier today he updated congressional leaders on libya and a senior aide says there is no clear end game on how to remove moammar gadhafi from power. more and reaction, as the u.s. prepares to hand thato control of the no-fly zo
at a major u.s. airport, the very same one where an air traffic controller fell asleep on the job. the close call this time around. >> and she said mexican pirates killed her husband while they were jet skiing on a border lake between texas and mexico. now six months later his body hasn't been found, no one has been arrested. the latest on the investigation, plus what she is vowing to do. it's all new, it's all live, it's "happening now". >>> hi everybody. we have a whole lot of ground to cough today. we're so glad you're with us. i'm jenna lee. jon: we do indeed. i'm jon scott. "happening now", nato takes charge of air operations in libya as the fighting intensifies in one strategic oil town. those are antiqaddafi rebels, giving it all they've got, trying to retake control of brega as they come under rocket fire from pro qaddafi forces, the opposition getting hit hard in other parts of the cup as well. jenna: the u.s. considering a plan to arm the rebels, even though nato's chief is opposed to the idea. right now the cia has operatives on the ground in libya. jon: meantime a sign that qadda
on u.s. actions in libya. that speech is scheduled for monday, 7:30 p.m. eastern time. watch it live right here on the fox news channel. >> heather: as we reported at the top of the show we do have new reaction coming to the death of an american pioneer led the way for women and politics, broke that glass ceiling. >> gregg: joining us -- do we have -- apparently we don't. july july with the latest. >> julie: after suffering complications of blood cancer she had battled for 12 years, geraldine ferraro was surrounded by her family when she passed away this morning at massachusetts general hospital. and president obama just moments ago, he says he will forever be remembered as a trail blazer that broke down barriers for women. whether it was at a public school, a teacher, an assistant district attorney, member of congress or candidate for vice president. she fought to uphold the founding ideals of quality and justice and opportunity for all. she leaves behind her husband, three children and eight grandchildren. in a statement her family says geraldine ferraro was widely known as a leade
is recinding his offer to step down by year's end. this as opposition to his regime testifies. they are a key u.s. ally in the fight against al-qaida warns his country is a ticking time bomb that could spiral into civil war without him. a deadly bullet blast killed more than a hundred people. today security forces reportedly fired teargas on some 4,000 demonstrators. in a bid to ease the crisis syrian's president is expected to lift the nearly 50-year state of emergency and move to lift restrictions on civil liberties. the country's emergency laws that gave police almost unlimited power to arrest without arpblgs will be lifted prior to the elections in september. this comes as the interim military rulers says hosni mubarak is under house arrest in egypt. this half he went for medical treatment. gregg: it has been ten days since the military mission began, and the president expected to tell the nation the mission is justified. white house correspondent mike emanuel live in washington with more on that. what else do we know about the case that president obama is going to make tonight? >> reporter:
american fighters jets are active at the moment, u.s. pilots flew 113 of the 175 coalition air sorties yesterday, for example, that u.s. role will shrink dramatically in the next few days leaving others to decide on military targeting. on the ground all public signals from the regime suggest continued defiance and continued attacks on the opposition. but here's the intriguing nugget. senior u.s. officials tell cnn tonight that some members of gadhafi's inner circle are reaching out to the state department and reaching out to other arab nations, as well. curious contacts to say the least but as yet our sources tell us no indication gadhafi himself is looking to negotiate an exit strategy. >> i think there are any number of possible outcomes here, and no one is in a position to predict them. whether they're -- whether there are major further defections or divisions within his family, there are a variety of possibilities that seems to me. >> a variety of possibilities but listen here, secretary gates isn't betting on a peaceful settlement. >> gadhafi has basically sworn that he will show
, and these are u.s. company that is have their core base here. the good news is i think if we meet the object i haves -- objectives that we've talked about, we will stimulate clean technologies, software, hardware, all of the real disruptive technologies that we are talking about. they are global, their competitors are global, they have to be global. i think if we do the right thing, we are going to do well by exports. which is real positive. >> this is a really important point. we tend to maybe think of these things in silos. but one the president's key initiatives is doubling exports over the next five years. and, of course, that involves, you know, large companies, boeing and others. when you look at the numbers, the real way we're going to do is in increasing in the small and medium-sized enterprises. turns out that 30% of the exports are from small and medium-sized enterprises. and that's disproportionally small. and there's only 250,000 small companies that export. so if you look at the math, there's almost three million small businesses $30 million smalls. xiii of them who have traded go
the situation in libya as "unique" and said the u.s. intervened militarily to prevent a humanitarian crisis. >> it's true that america cannot use our military wherever repression occurs. and given the costs and risks of intervention, we must always measure our interests against the need for action. but that cannot be an argument for never acting on behalf of what's right. of course, there is no question that libya and the world would be better off with gadhafi out of power. i along with many other world leaders have embraced that goal. and will actively pursue it through non-military means. but broadening our military mission to include regime change would be a mistake. >> and to further that point on regime change, the president said "weapon went down that road in iraq." he also said that history is not on gadhafi's side. he says nato will assume full control of the libyan mission wednesday, and the u.s. will play a supporting role, reducing the risk and the cost of the operation. >>> the president's speech was not enough to satisfy some critics on capitol hill. house speaker john boehner
out to the united states. senior u.s. officials tell cnn that a brother-in-law has been calling the state department almost every day. arab allies say they're also getting calls. we heard this talk yesterday from secretary of state clinton. it could be a sign that gadhafi's regime is looking for a way out. it could also be disinformation being put forward by the u.s. and others to make gadhafi not trust the people around him. in an interview, president obama said that gadhafi could wait it out, even though his forces have been weakened. today, secretary of state clinton said gadhafi and his inner circle have some choices to make. >> it will be up to gadhafi and his insiders to determine what their next steps are. but we would certainly encourage that they would make the right decision. not only institute a real comprehensive cease-fire, but withdraw from the cities and the military actions and prepare for a transition that does not include colonel gadhafi. the quickest way for him to end this is to actually serve the libyan people by leaving. >> gadhafi shows no sign that he's r
a command center. of course, it's been french jets, british jets and u.s. jets that have launched most of the air strikes. >> reza, we were told from the beginning that allied air pour power is only really protecting civilians. is that meaningful at this point? >> well, at this point there's no question. it's facilitating the push by the opposition forces west towards tripoli, the final destination. look at march 19th. that was the date when this no-fly zone was put in place. that's when opposition forces started pushing west. on saturday the air strikes softened up the artillery units. then it was brega, ras lanuf. the first little bit of resistance. the air strikes are pivotal in the progress of the rebel forces. >> and nato is supposed to take control of the no-fly zone today and the whole operation by the end of the week. does this matter to the rebels? do they feel this is what's helping them? >> it will matter if the air strikes are deescalated. with nato taking control, there are some member states that are not as enthusiastic as others about the aggressive nar of the air strike
to our correspondent with the opposition right now. president obama tried to explain why the u.s. intervened military as gadhafi was closing in on benghazi a little more than a week ago. >> at this particular moment, we were faced with the prospect of violence on a horrific scale. we had a unique ability to stop that violence. an international mandate for action. a broad coalition preached to join us. the support of arab countries, and a plea for help from the libyan people themselves. we also had the ability to stop gadhafi's forces in their tracks without putting american troops on the ground. to brush aside america's responsibility as a leader and more profoundly our responsibilities to our fellow human beings under such circumstances, would have been a betrayal of who we are. >> a lot more on what the president said in a moment. we'll also look tonight in an incredibly disturbing incident that looked at a tripoli hotel full of journalists. this woman was dragged away by gadhafi officials, we have updates about what's happened since. i'll talk to nick robert son about it. the
the transition from u.s. command has been seemless, but there are still serious questions about the u.s. involvement moving forward, what to do about the rebels, of course, reports of the cia, on the ground. this as lawmakers remain divided over our role there. >> they are clearly in violation of the act that sets three and only three conditions under which the president can commit armed forces. one them is declaration war, authorization of congress, there's been none and three is a national emergency caused by an attack on united states territories, possessions or armed forces. there has been none. so this is clearly illegal. martha: there has been so much discussion over getting approval from congress for what is going on on the ground in libya, and right now we are watching some unfolding testimony in front of the house armed services committee, secretary of defense robert gates, and also we want to play for you a comment moments ago from the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, admiral mike mullen. let's listen to what he had to say: >> we have continued to strike at qaddafi's mil
. and in about 45 minutes, former u.s. comp then, political strategist maria cardona and john feehery and we will discuss the arab world with a former u.s. ambassador to morocco, marc ginsburg. on this channel, "washington journal" is next, live with your phone calls. later today, we will give you a brown paper -- roundtable that will include the mayor of boston, st. paul, the minnesota, green though, mississippi, and sacramento, california. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] host: the video on your screen is some of the latest footage on the air raids in libya, courtesy of the aljazeera network. with the president act in town, questions are being raised about u.s. policy and goals in libya. that is our discussion this morning on the "washington journal" as we go through the newspapers. what do you think? how is the president handling the libya conflict so far? 202 is the area code -- how do you think the president is handling the libyan conflict. yesterday speaker john boehner sent this letter to the president. speaker boehner list several questions he asks the question
that the white house says nato will take greater command authority leading to more questions as to who u.s. troops respond to. is it the u.s. military or nato? the present will talk about this tomorrow. guest: this shows that there is a concern at the white house about congress and the broader american public if they understand the mission or support the mission. that will be an issue for the next few days for the white house to address this and obama to define what his ideas are and how he wants to get there. host: we have the aljazeera washington chief and we have the reporter for "the washington post." good morning. caller: i am curious -- does any of this have to do with the arab countries and the turmoil? the issue that nobody wants to talk about has to be there. it has to be included in cnn. it is the country of israel. we have to get the shield away and not be able -- afraid to talk about the issues of israel and the palestinians. host: we will put that issue on the table right now. thank you. guest: the viewer raises a very important point. israel has as we all know, for several de
, living in an economy where there is a u.s. and in the u.s.s.r., what is the role in this adulation? who has access to arms and weapons? for example, what is going on in mexico right now with the house world arms trade? host: we're talking with all of you today. you can call in about your thoughts on the 30th anniversary of the reagan assassination attempt, or you can send as a tweak on twitter. there are the addresses. we are also asking the question on our facebook page. if you want, you can continue that conversation on that side as well. montana on the republican line. caller: i am a republican. host: and you are on the air. caller: high among the republican committee of great falls, montana. i am a republican. hello? host: you have to turn your television down. that is why we're having confusion here. an independent scholar, that morning. caller: i am 27 years old, so i was born about that time. but i went for social studies of that nature. there was a lot of racial disparity, well our clients and all day, to make the majority of white folks look get blacks as lazy, did not want to
is you are not entirely convinced u.s. forces will be on the ground in libya. as you answer that question, this was apparently one of the president's first demands. no american boots on the sands in libya. why could you think that could change? >> i think they can get into a stalemate. the only way they will be able to win is to put in, quote, a stablization force. because i think the tribes in tripoli versus the tribes in benghazi, the fact is, they could go to a stalemate and we are looking like we did in april, may, june of 2003 in iraq. you have those dissident forces. those tribes that do not wants to be ruled by the tribes coming from benghazi that you will have a counter insurgency. and we have seen that movie before. bill: your points is the rebels would not be able to hold on to a win. >> right. using the logic of our intervention in libya should we not be in syria, bahrain, north korea, iran, or yemen? a lot of countries. why libya, general? >> that's the question that befuddles me. i believe it's this responsibility to protect strategy that samantha powers conceived and has bee
their leaders. listen. one u.s. ally calls the situation there, quote, deteriorating rapidlyof. remember, some officials are calling yemen the new wild west for al qaeda terrorists. we'll get to all of that in a minute. >>> first, mubarak is gon in egypt. gadhafi is under siege in libya. is bashar assad next? that's the question today rumbling across the middle east because the spark of rolution s reached the arab powerhouse syria. this is damascus today.ot antigovernment protests spread to the syrian capital and beyond. here's where it started, daraa, south of damascus. believe it or not, we are told with all the arrests about a month ago, a dozenz teen sz ho it started. they were arrested for spraying antigovernment graffiti. then on wednesday, this government forces opened fire in daraa. accounts remain sketchy, but the tape we're about to watch does give us some idea. as we sa, the exact circumstances remain unclear, as do the numberof deaths. but yesterday the government conceded it made a mistake and announced new reforms. today's sponse from the sreet suggests that may not be enough. w
's forces driving the opposition fighters back from their earlier gains and now the u.s. and its allies still not ruling out the possibility of arming the rebels. where are we now? good morning, everybody, welcome here, i'm bill hemmer live in "america's newsroom". how you doing martha? martha: doing well, bill, good to see you, folks. there's a lot going on. i'm martha maccallum. as you can see, there's heavy fire in the town of ras lanuf, a town the rebels thought they had taken back, now they fight a wave of nato air strikes, forces loyal to qaddafi once again back on the advance and putting the rebels in a very tough situation, pinned down by huge rockets, qaddafi's mob said to be closing in once again. bill: rec leventhal, leading our coverage, he has moved to the east of ras lanuf and what that is happened in this battle, rick? >> reporter: good morning, bill and martha. we just lost power in adjabiya, this town fell to qaddafi troops, regained by the rebels and could be taken over once again by qaddafi's troops. they have been striking rebel positions west of us in the town of ra
? no. are we -- do we have u.s. troops on the ground in libya? no. you can call it -- it's been a false argument that some media outlets have tried to engage that -- about the in a moment clayture here. it is the use of military force in concert with our allies. >> again, that presidential finding that president obama signed a couple weeks ago does authorize the cia to provide arms and support, although they've not yet provided the arms. >>> on capitol hill the chairman of the house select intelligence committee, congressman mike rogers, argued for not arming the rebels. >> we don't want to arm the rebels until we know who they are. we know what they're against, moammar gadhafi. we don't know who they're for or what they're for. we've had good experience in our history where things have gone wrong. it's very, very, very important that we take lots of thought, and we have to have lots better intelligence on who they are in total before we would even consider arming the rebels. >> rogers is one of many lawmakers briefed on libya by secretary of state hillary clinton, defense secretary rob
on "good morning america" and appeared to be suggesting that the u.s. is considering a request to arm the rebel opposition. some members of the coalition are pushing for this, but there are open questions about who the opposition is. i asked a pentagon official just that yesterday. >> we're not talking with the opposition. we have -- we would like a much better understanding of the opposition. we don't have it. so, yes, it does matter to us, and we're trying to fill in those knowledge gaps. >> reporter: that includes questions about towns in eastern libya, which have a history of anti-american activity and have served as recruiting zones in towns like darnah. in april, 2008, a massive intelligence find in northern iraq showed 19% of the suicide bombers in iraq came from darnah, libya. "newsweek" did a cover story on this in april, 2008, focusing on darnah and the recruitment by al-qaeda of suicide bombers in the libyan town. we've asked the state department about it and have been told that they're not doing interviews on the issue of the opposition at this point in time. megyn? megyn:
and 19 miles to evacuate. you remember the u.s. evacuation zone is 50 miles away from the fukushima plant. now they are expanding it to get closer to where we are on this. so far the evacuation is voluntary, it could become mandatory if the conditions get worse. as we mentioned at the top of this hour there are fears that there could be a genuine breach in one of those nuclear reactors. as soon as we get more on that we will bring it right to you. and this week america's top prosecutor attorney general eric holder met with police chiefs to discuss the rising danger to police across this country. according to the latest statistics 50 enforcement officers were killed in the line of duty through march 24th of this year. that come mayor with 45 in the same period of 2010. this has been on the rise. there is a new push to protect those who work so hard and put their lives on the line to protect us. doug mckelway is live with more on this. good afternoon, doug. >> reporter: good afternoon, martha. what is most disturbing about that it is occurring at a time when violent crime and murder is gene
all of this is. on the heels of a nuclear prices in japan, south carolina here in the u.s. went to court demanding that the nuclear regulatory commission provide a permanent place to store america's waste. there are 104 operating reactors, they're scattered across 65 plants in 31 different states. if you take a look at this map, this gives you a better idea of exactly where this 63 thousand tons of spent fuel, the darker the color of the state, the more radioactive waste that state has, according to the nrc. again, we're talking about 63,000 tons of spent fuel. if you take a look, with the telestrator working, illinois is the state with most, 776 tons. coming in second place is pennsylvania. as we know, pennsylvania, the site of three mile island, the nuclear site that had zadisaste back in the late '80s. and 3,700 tons of spent fuel. pretty much a tie with north carolina and south carolina here. let me show you a map quickly that illustrates what we're talking about when we say spent fuel. these are the spent fuel pools. they're steel-lined concrete pools filled with water like
to school. kept the lights on during a calm day at the wind farm. heated 57 million u.s. homes. simmered grandma's chicken noodle soup. melted tons of recycled glass. roasted millions of coffee beans. provided electricity for nearly 29 million home computers. heated your bathwater. cooked your takeout. lit your way home. we helped america import less of its energy. cleared the air by burning cleaner than other fuel sources, with less pollutants and no mercury. and tomorrow, we could do even more. we're cleaner, domestic, abundant and ready now. we're america's natural gas. the smarter power today. learn more at anga.us. basic. preferred. at meineke i have options on oil changes. and now i get free roadside assistance with preferred or supreme. my money. my choice. my meineke. >>> a live picture of flight tracker.com, you can see there behind me, those are all the planes that are in the air right now. imagine, though, what would happen if they had to land without the help of air traffic control? that actually did happen to two planes at washington's reagan national airport shortly after m
on the ground were the clearest indication that intensive air strikes carried out by the u.s., french and naval assets over the past week have softened up the libyan military considerably. meanwhile, the front page of " the new york times" - below the fold in the new york times, there's a story on the event recovered live on c-span yesterday. this is prompting us to ask republicans to define what will define the gop primary. with that, republicans only -- 202 the area code. our first call is from ardmore, oklahoma. caller: good morning. i believe the people of united states, their first concern is the economy. another thing we have to be concerned about is full disclosure. in this administration under obama, there has never been such hit in things. he spends money like going to brazil and giving out this money. they owe us tons of money. under the clinton years clinton lent them $100 billion. it goes on and on and on. when did congress lose the power of the purse? the other thing which is the greatest thing in our nation is we have to come back to god and of this nation repents if my people cal
in the hour. now libya, though. the top commander of the u.s. military operation in libya says nato has agreed in principle to not only take over the no-fly zone, but also the broader mission of protecting civilians. he said it's all going to happen very soon. here's what general carter hamm said today on "the situation room." >> we expect that nato will take over the no-fly zone this weekend, and then the next piece, the third and final piece, is the mission to protect civilians. nato, it's my understanding that nato has agreed to that in principle and will this command decide on the procedures and timing of accepting that mission. but i think that will probably occur in the very near future. >> ham also said that removing moammar gadhafi from power by military means is not the aim of the mission and the coalition isn't arming the opposition. but the coalition strikes on gadhafi's mechanism of power continue. authorities say coalition fighter planes took out seven libyan tanks in 24 hours. in fact, we got this video from the british ministry of defense showing british aircraft droiing those l
with a caveat. while nato will be in charge of enforcing the no-fly zone, it is the u.s. that will take the lead when it comes to the more difficult task of planning attacks on gadhafi's ground forces. even as the dictator promoted every soldier in his army today, the man leading the american mission is staying ca hard to make it hard for gadhafi and his troops to kill its own citizens and destroy property. but that is as i described yesterday, a delicate mission. >> nbc news chief news correspondent richard engel is in benghazi. what do we make of reports that gadhafi wants to meet with the opposition? >> we've heard many reports like that. we've also heard that gadhafi wants to send 2,000 people carrying olive branchs to benghazi, and one of the rebel opposition leaders said they're worried about this. they're worried it could be a trojan horse. they don't want these people to come into the city. they don't trust gadhafi at all to hold negotiations, they don't trust him to hold a cease-fire, and frankly don't want his representatives in benghazi or even close to where the rebels are. >> what a
. in the u.s., they're not concerned so they lobby in a different direction. >> thank you. i will ask one more question. this is my second round. if you fast forward to today and look at the other end of the buchan, march 4, 2011, problems we have now, the chair has described moral hazard and the like. we talked about that. what did you do? i can anticipate your answers as i think you've given them, just to make it very clear on the record, what would you recommend march 4, 2011? >> briefly, first, i want to emphasize the things we have said. one, you need more capital. and that you need increasing capital has to be with the size of the bank's, the risk of too big to fail. it has to be that this distortion has to be eliminated. secondly, if you have a problem, you should play by the ordinary rules of capitalism. when you go into bankruptcy, you convert that to equity. it is really a version of the standard rules of capitalism. you look at the numbers back in citibank, they had enough long- term capital it was more than enough to manage them, more than we put in. the answer -- the resoluti
even though libya is not vital to u.s. interests? that's the question. joining us now, dick morris, former advisor to president clinton and the author of the new book "revolt." all right. that's the question for you. >> well, i think that -- i wrote this in a column on my web site dickmorris.com. this guy is playing checkers when he should be playing chess. he's moving the pieces one at a time without thinking five moves down the road. so ok, we're intervening from the air to protect civilians from mass slaughter. all right, that's good right now. now, what happens if we can't get rid of qaddafi and he continues to slaughter the people? you're going to send in ground troops or just say, ok, now we'll turn a blind eye. let's say we get rid of qaddafi and then an iraq style civil war breaks out where his cronies and political party goes underground challenging the rebels with ongoing terrorist tactics like happened in iraq. are we going to turn a blind eye to that? at what point do you disengage. at what point do the libyan rebels take over and turn out to be heavily infiltrated by a
back to world war ii. are you ruling out u.s. military hardware assistance? >> i'm not ruling it out but i'm also not ruling it in. we're not taking anything off the table at this point. our primary military goal is to protect civilian populations and set up the no-fly zone. our primary strategic goal is for gadhafi to step down so the libyan people have an opportunity to live a decent life. >> we'll get to some of the other questions around this, including the double standard as it pertains to syria and other countries and whether or not the president should have gone to congress. first let's go around the table. pat, i'll start with you. if we arm the rebels aren't you in a sense going after gadhafi in the biggest way, which is something we were not going to do. >> you're much more openly doing what you're actually doing anyhow. >> exactly. >> you're getting into the war more deeply on the side of the folks who want to ouflt gadhafi. it will be a longer and bloodier war between gadhafi's forces and the rebels, you put all that equipment in there. it will be a real hellish mess. >>
say really quickly, there are two institutions. i'm leaving out an important institution, the u.s. military and willie geist. >> i know. >> you look at willie geist's poll numbers. >> look at him. >> do you trust him to read your sports every morning? >> do you want me to do sports this morning. >> better if we don't, mika, with due respect. >>> i've been pushing this yankees as david, red sox as goliath. the new york papers, check this out, the yankees, the little team that could. >> what is that? >> and look at this one, hot dogs -- >> highest payroll in sports. >> hot dog as in underdogs. the yankees are the hot underdog in baseball. beautiful yankee stadium. there it s. that's a little team. >> that's a beautiful mall. seriously. >> there's great shopping in there, joe. there really is. for a lot of people, today is the best dave the year. opening day of major league baseball. here's some of the games, a breakdown. you have the yankees opening. hopefully if the weather holds up against the tigers. the drives, a lot of people picking them to win that division. the nats if that
for investment from u.s.. i think finally you will get a kick out of the one mccain and i were on. we met with a crew of the leaders of the uprising and one of them said to us, senators, we want to ask if you can help us to get one american who we would most like to come and speak to us here and i thought to myself who is this going to be. and the answer, mark zuckerburg. [laughter] welcome because -- because they felt in some sense, first he represented the new world of telecommunications but that in some sense he had provided or facebook provided them with what we might call the weapons in their peaceful revolution. >> very remarkable. i'm very hopeful. >> i can't think the two of you enough for what you've done in my testimony. it's very helpful, very specifically helpful to focus our review that will go on for the rest of this year. we are going to keep the record of and for 15 days for additional questions and statements. thank you again very much. the hearing is adjourned. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations]÷?oy,
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